Section B: Practice Problems Compare and Order Numbers within 1,000

Section Summary

Details

In this section, we learned how to compare three-digit numbers. We used number lines, base-ten diagrams, and the value of the digits in base-ten numerals to help us compare and explain our thinking.

Diagrams are helpful when comparing numbers because you can see and compare hundreds to hundreds, tens to tens, and ones to ones. We learned that you can do this with the digits too.

Base-ten diagram. 4 hundreds. 3 tens. 2 ones.
Base-ten diagram.

The number line shows the numbers in order, so we can see which number is the largest based on its location.

Number line. Scale 400 to 500 by tens. First tick mark, 400. Last tick mark, 500. One point plotted between 420 and 430 and between 430 and 440.

We also wrote expressions using the , , and symbols.

432 is greater than 424

424 is less than 432

Problem 1 (Lesson 8)

  1.  Number line. Scale 500 to 600 by hundreds. 11 evenly spaced tick marks. First tick mark, 500. Last tick mark, 600. Point plotted at fifth tick mark, not labeled.

    What number is represented by the point on the number line?

  2. Locate and label 738 on the number line.

     Number line. Scale 730 to 740 by tens. 11 evenly spaced tick marks. First tick mark, 730. Last tick mark, 740.

Problem 2 (Lesson 9)

  1. Estimate the location of 247 and 274 on the number line. Mark each number with a point. Label the point with the number it represents.

     Number line. Scale 240 to 280 by tens. First tick mark, 240. Last tick mark, 280.
  2. Use , , or to compare 247 and 274. Explain your reasoning.

Problem 3 (Lesson 10)

Here are diagrams for two numbers.

A
Base-ten diagram. 2 hundreds. 4 tens. 1 one.
B
Base-ten diagram. 2 hundreds. 3 tens. 7 ones.
  1. Which two numbers are pictured in the diagrams.

  2. Which number is larger? How do you know?

  3. Use or to compare the numbers.

Problem 4 (Lesson 11)

  1. Find one number that goes in the blanks to make both equations true.

  2. Can you find one number that goes in the blanks to make both equations true? Explain or show your reasoning.

Problem 5 (Lesson 12)

  1. Locate 441, 418, 481, 487, and 429 on a number line. Mark each number with a point. Label each point with the number it represents.

    Number line. Scale 410 to 490 by tens. First tick mark, 410. Last tick mark, 490.
  2. Order the numbers from greatest to least.

Problem 6 (Exploration)

Mile markers are markers on the road with numbers listed in order. During a trip, Mai first saw this mile marker. The last mile marker she saw was Mile 173.

Number line. Scale 100 to 180 by fives. Evenly spaced tick marks. First tick mark, 100. Last tick mark, 180.
  • Show on the number line the first and last mileage markers Mai went by on the road.

  • Which mile markers with 0 in the ones place did Mai pass? Explain your reasoning and label these on the number line.

Problem 7 (Exploration)

  1. What is the largest three-digit number you can make with the numbers 2, 3, 6, 7, and 9 ? (You can use each number at most once.) Explain your reasoning.

  2. What is the smallest three-digit number you can make with the numbers 6, 3, 9, 7, and 2? (You can use each number at most once.) Explain your reasoning.